Unlike similar endeavors, it is designed to serve as “a place focused on contemporary sculpture.” In this spirit, there is no permanent exhibition: To stay up to date, existing exhibits are constantly replaced by new arrivals. A popular draw on the art roster, the park attracts 120,000 visitors per annum. Currently on display: KölnSkulptur # 7 with fourteen new works supplementing the area’s 40 existing exhibits.

Photo: Ioanna Gogolin
Photo: Ioanna Gogolin

The temporary, ephemeral slant injects new life into the park’s concept. Every two years, the entire display is restaged around the few integral and lasting works of art. These are only moved to offer new facets and perspectives.

Photo: Peter Bender
Photo: Peter Bender

At the same time, the park offers an eerie sense of calm and respite between busy Riehlerstrasse, Konrad-Adenauer-Ufer, and Cologne’s Zoo Bridge. The moment you enter the park, you are engulfed by sudden silence and free to pursue the guided walks around the small complex, designed for maximum enjoyment and discovery.

Photo: Ioanna Gogolin
Photo: Ioanna Gogolin

A private initiative by Michael and Eleonore Stoffel, the by now internationally renowned park was created in 1997. With its focus on changing displays and a delightfully broad spectrum of modern contemporary outdoor sculpture, it has gained increasing appreciation and audience numbers over seven exhibitions.

Photo: Peter Bender
Photo: Peter Bender

The park’s latest focus and incarnation, KölnSkulptur #7 (open until spring 2015) presents a novel (artistic) landscape with enlarged and additional spaces that offer brand new views and vistas. In 2011, the open pavilion Garden Gallery joined the set-up and added a new landmark to the location, created by Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto.

Photo: Ioanna Gogolin
Photo: Ioanna Gogolin

Now, the charitable foundation behind it all focuses on securing the sculpture park’s future and preserving it as a place of artistic dialog and reflection based on the unique symbiosis of art and nature

Open daily and free to visit, the park offers many delights – and a smartphone-based mobile art guide accessed via QR codes. Those who prefer a human guide can join a tour, held on the first Sunday of each month at 3pm for a small fee.